Archaeology on YouTube: 2021.09.24

ArchaeologyTV Youtube Channel

Preserving Cyprus and Peru: Call to Action September 2021
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 09/21/2021

If you’ve previously traveled to Cyrpus or Peru, your experience as a traveler can help the U.S. Cultural Property Advisory Committee with their upcoming deliberations. Watch this short video to find out how you can join the AIA to speak up for threatened archaeological sites.


Archaeology Abridged: The Secrets of an Ancient Indian City by Dr. Monica Smith
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 09/16/2021

The Indian subcontinent is home to a number of the world’s great civilizations and religious traditions. About two and a half thousand years ago, a tremendous synergy of urbanism, rulership, writing systems, and the advent of Buddhism and Jainism was expressed in hundreds of archaeological sites. Among these was the magnificent city of Sisupalgarh on India’s eastern coast, where an international team of researchers from the University of California and Deccan College have focused their efforts to learn about the monumental architecture and daily lives of a thriving ancient metropolis. Tune in to learn about how archaeologists see under the surface without digging, how a fortification wall isn’t just for defense, and why a little “bling” explains the irresistible pull of urbanism past and present.


"Historical Fiction: An End-Product of Archaeology?" by Steven Saylor
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 09/07/2021

In their engagement with the ancient world, archaeology and historical fiction may be considered to reside at two ends of a spectrum, one engaged in tactile, hands-on contact with artifacts, invariably involving cooperation between colleagues, workers, and authorities, the other entirely imaginative and verbal, drawing on many sources but created in solitude. But archaeology and historical fiction have in common a desire to make an authentic connection with the past, and to find ways to share that connection with others. The author has spent the last thirty writing fiction set in ancient Rome, frequently drawing inspiration from archaeological publications and exhibits. His latest novel, Dominus, completes a trilogy (begun by Roma and Empire) that follows the fortunes of a family from prehistoric Rome to the reign of Constantine the Great. In this talk he will attempt to share insights into a creative process that may represent an end-product of archaeology, citing the case of a recently-discovered artifact that finds its way into the pages of Dominus.


Archaeology Abridged with Martin Carver: "Interpreting Sutton Hoo"
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/24/2021

Each generation that encounters the Sutton Hoo Story sees it as if for the first time. At first it was a treasure, then it was an illustration of early kings and just lately it has become a window on England’s early years. There are now three cemeteries at Sutton Hoo, the first of a sixth-century wealthy family, the second a group of seventh century nation-builders celebrated in burial mounds and the last the sad disposal of eighth to tenth century execution victims, probably those who failed to conform to the new regime. These three cemeteries illuminate a changing world, provide us with new history. But they also reveal something of the actors, what they were expressing, the references they made to other countries, what they were thinking. Martin Carver reinterprets the meaning of the great ship burial and the other burials made before and after it at Sutton Hoo, explores the connections its people had with the development of the kingdom of East Anglia, with Britain, Scandinavia, Europe and the Mediterranean. In pursuit of parallels with mound building and state building, as a coda, he pays a visit to Japan and the USA.


The Roman Retail Revolution by Dr. Steve Ellis
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/14/2021

This presentation dives deep into the social and economic worlds of the Roman shop. As the most common form of any singular type of Roman building, shops were at once a vital fixture in the operation of a Roman city: they were omnipresent along all of the busiest roads, and gathered in number at street intersections and other central locations. But what do we really know about the place of Roman shops and bars in all of this urban system? And how can we better understand how they were used by those on either side of the shop counter? In order to throw some new light on the formation of Roman retail landscapes, a new kind of socio-economic framework is offered to understand the motivations behind urban investment in Roman shops. Their historical development is also unraveled to identify three major waves - or, revolutions - in the shaping of retail landscapes. The presentation features two entirely new bodies of evidence. The first is generated from the University of Cincinnati’s recent archaeological excavations into a Pompeian neighborhood of close to 20 shop-fronts. The second comes from the presenter’s field-survey of the retail landscapes of more than 100 cities from across the full breadth of the Roman world. The richness of this information, combined with an interdisciplinary approach to the lives of the Roman sub-elite, results in a refreshingly original look at the history of retailing and urbanism in the Roman world. This lecture was delivered to the AIA Iowa City Society on March 29, 2021.


The Lynch Site and 13th and 14th Century Ethnogenesis on the Central Plains by Dr. Douglas Bamforth
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/02/2021

Plains farmers settled at the Lynch site in northeastern Nebraska during the latter decades of the 13th century, in the midst of a wave of social change and dislocation across the mid-continent as Cahokia collapsed and drought spread widely over much of North America. In contrast to the small homesteads on the central Plains prior to this time, Lynch covers nearly 200 acres, suggesting a community bigger than anything that had existed in the region before. Potters at the site made classic Plains vessels and classic midwestern Oneota vessels in households that were nearly side-by-side and mixed these styles together on other pots. This lecture addresses the social changes at work in the mid-continent at this time along with the history of work at Lynch from the 1930s to the present, including geophysical prospecting and excavation in the last two years. Viewed in the context of the Plains as a whole, the changes at Lynch and nearby sites represent a sea-change in social formations and likely mark the appearance of the modern Pawnee and Arikara nations. This lecture was delivered to the Western Illinois Society on February 17, 2021.


Hannibal’s Secret Weapon by Dr. Patrick Hunt
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/02/2021

Employing brilliant surprise tactics, Hannibal beat the Romans in quite a few decisive battles where he was outnumbered but increased his arsenal by weaponizing nature. At Trebbia he made the Romans cross the freezing Trebbia river in midwinter, thereby neutralizing them before battle; at Lake Trasimene he hid his ambushing forces in the summer fog off the lake and destroyed the marching Roman army by coming unchecked from several hidden unexpected directions in the above hills. At Volturnus, Hannibal created a diversionary army at night by tying wood between the horns of thousands of cattle and lighting it, then sending the cattle off in a different direction which the Romans chased, fooled into thinking the lights were Hannibal’s moving forces. At Cannae he forced the many Romans legions far outnumbering him into a narrow valley between a river and hills so they could not outflank him, but also had them face south to the blinding dust of an African summer sandstorm from the south, making it difficult to see his forces and irritating their eyes. Hannibal also may have been a pioneer of biological warfare on several occasions. These unusual tactics set the stage for many modern military uses of topography and the environment to gain an advantage over enemies, no doubt why Hannibal remains relevant and continues to be studied in detail by war colleges and military academies today.


The Anatomy of an Ancient Naval Battle by Dr. William Murray
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/02/2021

Toward the end of the First Punic War (264-241 B.C.), the Romans made a final effort to gain control of Western Sicily. They built new ships to make up for the losses of previous years and redoubled their efforts to gain control of Carthaginian strongholds, which they placed under siege. In response, the Carthaginians outfitted a relief fleet of warships and transports, which they loaded with supplies. On 10 March, 241 B.C., the Roman fleet destroyed this relief force as it sailed in from the west in what proved to be the last sea battle of the First Punic War. Guided by a fisherman’s recovery of a single bronze warship ram, the Sicilian Soprintendenza del Mare initiated a joint underwater project with RPM Nautical Foundation in 2005 and, together, they found the ancient debris field of the battle—the first ever discovered from an ancient sea battle. After two decades of research, only a portion of the full battle zone has been discovered and mapped. Rich in finds (23 bronze rams, 30+ helmets, multiple sword concretions, hundreds of amphoras destined for the troops ashore, etc.), this site allows us to attempt what has never before been possible, the analysis of an actual sea battle with reference to both historical texts and physical evidence. Guided by this goal, the lecture will detail the stages of a typical naval battle before introducing the peculiarities and problems posed by the new Egadi evidence.


My 40 Year Search for the Battle of Actium by Dr. William Murray
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/02/2021

In 31 BC, Octavian defeated Antony and Cleopatra in a naval battle off Cape Actium in Western Greece. A few years later, the victor constructed on the site of his personal camp a grand Victory Monument to commemorate the event. I first visited this site in 1978, and since then, have been trying to explain what I found there: the ruins of a massive rostral display whose complex details preserve evidence for the sizes of Antony’s and Cleopatra’s largest warships. After a brief attempt to find battle debris in the sea off Cape Actium, I was asked by Dr. Konstantinos Zachos to join his team in analyzing the results of his systematic excavations of the site. His work, conducted over a quarter century, has added much to our knowledge of this important monument—its original design, its elaborately decorated altar, its dedication text, and its period of use. At the same time, emerging 3D technologies have allowed me to comprehend the rostral display more fully, to visualize the monstrous sizes of the ships that fought in the final naval battle, and to restore the text of the dedication inscription. In this lecture, I will summarize the main results of our research, but do so in a personal manner, in the context of my own 40-year journey of discovery in search of the Battle of Actium.


The Archaeology of Anatolian Landscapes: Politics of Water and Ecology in the Hittite Borderlands?
By: ArchaeologyTV. Published: 06/02/2021

In the last few centuries of the Hittite Empire, the karstic watery landscapes of Çavuşçu Lake Basins to the west of the Konya Plain witnessed the construction of a prestigious, imperially sponsored monument at a prominent spring in the rural countryside: Tudhaliya IV’s sacred pool complex at Yalburt Yaylası near the Çavuşçu Lake. This impressive monument, accidentally discovered and excavated in 1970s, featured a lengthy commemorative inscription of the king, linking the site to Tudhaliya’s military campaigns to Lycia. Yalburt Monument is situated on a mountaintop in a borderland region south of the Hittite Upper Land and was located on the imperial road to the Mediterranean. The same king initiated the construction of a massive earthen dam at Köylütolu Yayla, only about 20 km south of Yalburt. Studying the agricultural landscape and the settlement history in the vicinity of these two monuments have shown that the Hittite imperial administration was interested in an agricultural rehabilitation program in this borderland region, right before the collapse of the empire. A series of well-preserved Hittite fortresses were also built in this landscape, and the material evidence from several mound sites point to the close affiliation of ceramic production with Hittite palatial culture. In this paper I discuss the results of the Yalburt Yaylası Archaeological Survey project that I have directed since 2010 in 9 archaeological field seasons, and discuss the politics of water, agriculture and land-use in the Hittite Empire. This lecture was given to the AIA Central Pennsylvania Society on April 11, 2021.


The Archaeology Channel

Strata: Portraits of Humanity, July 2021
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 09/21/2021

Strata: Portraits of Humanity, July 2021 (Declining Egyptian crafts; medieval French abbey) (1) Khan el-Khalili is an old Egyptian market that has been an indispensable aspect of Egyptian heritage. However, the Khan El Khalili craftsmen now face ongoing social and economic challenges that endanger their professions. (2) Digital imaging techniques create 3D reconstructions of Cormery Abbey in France’s Loire Valley, established initially in the time of Charlemagne and rededicated in 1054. This work helps sort out pressing questions about the age of important elements in the abbey’s architecture. Discover more cultural heritage topics at our website: http://archaeologychannel.org/strata Also Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheArchaeolo... Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@heritagetac LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4814340/ Twitter: http://bit.ly/194X1IA


Strata: Portraits of Humanity, June 2021
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 09/21/2021

Strata: Portraits of Humanity, June 2021(Prehistoric Southwest bracelets; Canada’s oldest army regiment) (1) Dr. Michele Koons, Curator of Archaeology at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, digs into the Museum collection drawers to tell us about some gorgeous shell bracelets from the prehistoric Hohokam culture in the American Southwest. (2) Canada's oldest army regiment, the Queen's York Rangers, traces its origins back to 1756 and the French and Indian War. In this film, follow the Rangers’ two-hundred-and-fifty-year journey from the American Revolution into the modern War On Terror as they continue to build their legacy. Discover more cultural heritage topics at our website: http://archaeologychannel.org/strata Also Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheArchaeolo... Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@heritagetac LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4814340/ Twitter: http://bit.ly/194X1IA


The Archaeology Channel International Film Festival 2021
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 06/04/2021

Preview of the films selected for the 2021 TAC International Film Festival. Learn more @ https://www.archaeologychannel.org/festival


Heritage Broadcasting Service New Release - 052421
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 05/21/2021

Heritage Broadcasting Service, or just plain Heritage, launched on January 1, 2021. Developed by the nonprofit Archaeological Legacy Institute (that’s us, the people who created The Archaeology Channel at archaeologychannel.org), Heritage at the outset features more than 100 outstanding film titles from many countries on familiar subjects. As of May 17th, 2021 new films include Chollywood, Saving Places, Tama Gaun: The Copper Village. Check out these and more, only on Heritage! https://www.heritagetac.org/


Heritage Broadcasting Service New Release - 051721
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 05/14/2021

Heritage Broadcasting Service, or just plain Heritage, launched on January 1, 2021. Developed by the nonprofit Archaeological Legacy Institute (that’s us, the people who created The Archaeology Channel at archaeologychannel.org), Heritage at the outset features more than 100 outstanding film titles from many countries on familiar subjects. As of May 17th, 2021 new films include Sunú, Palermo's Secret Waters, Tnalora: Baby Falling. Check out these and more, only on Heritage! https://www.heritagetac.org/


Strata: Portraits of Humanity, May 2021
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 05/14/2021

Strata: Portraits of Humanity, May 2021 (Paisley Abbey, Scotland) The Big Dig: Paisley Abbey 2019 documents an 8-week excavation, the latest phase in the long-term archaeological investigation of one of Scotland's most intriguing monuments, the Great Drain of Paisley Abbey. Extending 90 m, this finely crafted stone-lined 6-ft high conduit supposedly took waste from the Abbey complex to the White Cart River. This film shows professional archaeologists and community volunteers working to increase our knowledge of the Abbey precinct, the construction of the Drain itself and its impact on the community. Discover more cultural heritage topics at our website: http://archaeologychannel.org/strata Also Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheArchaeologyChannel/ Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@heritagetac LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4814340/ Twitter: http://bit.ly/194X1IA


Heritage Broadcasting Service New Release - 042621
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 04/23/2021

Heritage Broadcasting Service, or just plain Heritage, launched on January 1, 2021. Developed by the nonprofit Archaeological Legacy Institute (that’s us, the people who created The Archaeology Channel at archaeologychannel.org), Heritage at the outset features more than 100 outstanding film titles from many countries on familiar subjects. As of April 26th, 2021 new films include Agave Is Life, Etched in Bone, Karlu Karlu. Check out these and more, only on Heritage! https://www.heritagetac.org/


Strata: Portraits of Humanity, April 2021
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 04/21/2021

Strata: Portraits of Humanity, April 2021 (Aerial survey; British Columbia prehistoric site) (1) Dr. Chloe Duckworth, aka ArchaeoDuck, in her vlog tells us all about how and why archaeologists use aerial photography to find and interpret vanished archaeological sites. (2) This film, produced by the Digital Humanities Initiative at Hamilton College, New York, documents the field and lab research in Slocan Valley, British Columbia, since the year 2000. It explores the questions about and interpretations of the indigenous occupation of the Slocan Narrows, shedding light on the pre-colonial history of the valley. Discover more cultural heritage topics at our website: http://archaeologychannel.org/strata Check out the Archaeoduck's Channel: https://www.youtube.com/archaeoduck Also Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheArchaeologyChannel/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4814340/ Twitter: http://bit.ly/194X1IA


Strata: Portraits of Humanity, March 2021
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 03/17/2021

Strata: Portraits of Humanity, March 2021 (Yam festival in Ghana; Chickasaw vs. de Soto) Text: (1) The Yam Festival, known in the local Ewe dialect as “Te Za,” is a harvest festival in the Asogli State in the Volta Region of Ghana. Colorfully combining music, dancing, feasting, and local crafts, this event celebrates family, farmers, culture, and unity. (2) Landing at today’s Tampa Bay in 1539, Hernando de Soto and his army sought gold and glory. 1540 he entered Chickasaw territory and claimed authority over them. The Chickasaw eventually overcame these unwelcome visitors, ending de Soto’s American expedition. Discover more cultural heritage topics at our website: http://archaeologychannel.org/strata Also Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheArchaeologyChannel/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/groups/4814340/ Twitter: http://bit.ly/194X1IA


Audio News from Archaeologica
By: The Archaeology Channel. Published: 03/17/2021

The archaeology news of the week in audio, brought to you by The Archaeology Channel, compiled and written by volunteers, and read by Laura Pettigrew. The Audio News from Archaeologica is compiled from Archaeologica.org's daily news updates. https://www.archaeologychannel.org/audionews


Robert Cargill's Youtube Channel

The Name "Palestine" (and Why Scholars Use It)
By: XKV8R — Robert R. Cargill, PhD. Published: 09/02/2021

In this video Prof. Cargill examines the history of the name "Palestine," explains why scholars use the term, and why it is not a political statement when they use it. He also offers some insight into his approach to teaching history and dispels some common myths about the term Palestine. More about Dr. Robert R. Cargill, Associate Professor of Classics and Religious Studies at the University of Iowa: https://classics.uiowa.edu/people/robert-cargill and here: http://www.bobcargill.com Contribute to the Friends of the IAA (Israel Antiquities Authority): https://www.friendsofiaa.org/take-action Visit JewishHistory.com: http://jewishhistory.com/ Visit Bible & Archaeology at http://www.uiowa.edu/bam


Watch Jerusalem: City of Faith and Fury on CNN
By: XKV8R — Robert R. Cargill, PhD. Published: 07/21/2021

Don't miss CNN's latest documentary series, "Jerusalem: City of Faith and Fury," Sunday nights at 10PM eastern and pacific, 9PM central, beginning July 18, 2021.


Introducing Bible & Archaeology
By: XKV8R — Robert R. Cargill, PhD. Published: 07/21/2021

Introducing "Bible & Archaeology," a new online publication from the University of Iowa.


The Tel Dan Inscription
By: XKV8R — Robert R. Cargill, PhD. Published: 04/27/2021

In this video Prof. Cargill examines the Tel Dan, or "House of David" Inscription and reveals what it says, what it doesn't say, gives its proper historical context, and explains why it's important to biblical archaeology. More about Dr. Robert R. Cargill, Associate Professor of Classics and Religious Studies at the University of Iowa: https://clas.uiowa.edu/classics/people/robert-cargill and here: http://www.bobcargill.com Contribute to the Friends of the IAA (Israel Antiquities Authority): https://www.friendsofiaa.org/take-action Visit JewishHistory.com: http://jewishhistory.com/ Read more: Tel Dan Stele (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel_Dan_stele Biran, Avraham, and Joseph Naveh, "An Aramaic Stele from Tel Dan," Israel Exploration Journal 43/2-3 (1993): 81–98. Special thanks: Bruce Zuckerman, West Semitic Research Project Israel Antiquities Authority


The Tel Dan Inscription - Extended Version with Jehu's Rebellion
By: XKV8R — Robert R. Cargill, PhD. Published: 04/27/2021

In this video Prof. Cargill examines the Tel Dan, or "House of David" Inscription and reveals what it says, what it doesn't say, gives its proper historical context, and explains why it's important to biblical archaeology. This extended version offers a discussion of Jehu's Revolt, and how his usurpation of the throne of Israel may have been part of a conspiracy with King Hazael of Aram-Damascus. More about Dr. Robert R. Cargill, Associate Professor of Classics and Religious Studies at the University of Iowa: https://clas.uiowa.edu/classics/people/robert-cargill and here: http://www.bobcargill.com Contribute to the Friends of the IAA (Israel Antiquities Authority): https://www.friendsofiaa.org/take-action Visit JewishHistory.com: http://jewishhistory.com/ Read more: Tel Dan Stele (Wikipedia): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tel_Dan_stele Biran, Avraham, and Joseph Naveh, "An Aramaic Stele from Tel Dan," Israel Exploration Journal 43/2-3 (1993): 81–98. Schniedewind, William M., “Tel Dan Stela: New Light on Aramaic and Jehu’s Revolt,” Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research 302 (1996): 75–90. Special thanks: Bruce Zuckerman, West Semitic Research Project Israel Antiquities Authority


Recording Archaeology Youtube Channel

The Iron Bridge in mixed media: An artistic reflection on interdisciplinary research
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/13/2021

PVA glue and coloured tissue paper may not immediately spring to mind as primary research materials for conducting a study of how the values of an industrial World Heritage Sites are communicated to tourists. Finding myself on an art day focused on the world’s first Iron Bridge certainly made me reflect that interdisciplinary research rarely turns out as you expect! Over the course of a year I carried out a mixture of ethnographic, geographic, digital humanities and contemporary archaeological fieldwork in Ironbridge Gorge. The valley is famous, amongst enthusiasts at least, for being the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution, but that’s not necessarily the story that the million or so tourists who visit each year encounter. Tourism, much like interdisciplinary research, is messy and colourful, varied and even a little weird. In this participatory paper I will reflect on the contributions and challenges that the four disciplinary lenses brought to the study and everyone will get to try some collage too! CORALIE ACHESON, ARUP


The industrialisation of Thames water management in the 19th century from many
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/13/2021

The embankment of the Thames in central London was carried out between 1865 and 1900 as part of a city wide scheme to improve sanitation through sewage removal, drainage, clean water provision and improvements to Thames water quality. The Embankment construction took place against a backdrop of industrialisation of the waterfront, including the establishment and expansion of factories, ship building, and dock facilities. The period in which the Embankment was build has been the subject of vast amounts of research, largely by historians, and a smaller number of archaeologists. This paper seeks to illustrate the ways in which a wider variety of stories of Thames-side industrialisation can be told using alternative sources, and alternative approaches to historical source material. Taking an inter-disciplinary approach to the industrialisation of the Thames waterside allows us to move beyond purely industrial archaeological or historical narratives and understand the social complexities and realities of the lived experience. HANNA STEYNE, UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER


The archaeology of 20th century factory management: Four factories on the Team Valley Trading Estate
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/12/2021

This paper makes an attempt to assess the implications of industrial archaeology of the 20th century for organisational or management theory. While business historians have recognised the relevance of their work to more applied management theory, archaeologists have generally failed to do so (Kipping and Üsdiken 2008). However, as 20th century industrial archaeology becomes more common archaeologists will more often encounter structures built with reference to modern management concepts. The 20th century witnessed significant changes in management practice which are understood historically. We will use both historical and archaeological methods to determine whether changes in factory management during the mid- to late-20th century (for our purposes 1930s-1990s) can be archaeologically recognised. In order to examine the changes in management practice during this period four factories on the Team Valley Trading Estate built between 1938 and 1939 were surveyed. It was possible to detect elements of planning for efficiency of movement and process both in the offices and the factory floor. Similarly, division of labour between workers of different status and gender were also evident. Such differences in status were not only part of practical organisation but were marked symbolically. RONAN O'DONNELL, DURHAM UNIVERSITY


Investigating industrial pasts and legacies from multi-and interdisciplinary perspective
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/12/2021

The topic of multi- and interdisciplinary research has been gaining traction in recent years. Studies of industrial archaeology and heritage have long utilised interdisciplinary methods and perspectives, being concerned with various kinds of evidence of industrial processes and legacies, both material and immaterial. In this session we explore the place and value of multi- and inter disciplinary practices within studies of industrial pasts and legacies. In this, we acknowledge the growing interest in these topics within other disciplines, such as economic and oral history, sociology, geography, environmental humanities, photography and art, amongst others.We seek to examine the current conditions of knowledge production, how new bodies of knowledge and practice are being formed, the shifts of power, and how they change us. Some questions that we seek to address are: What relationships are currently being forged and why, and in what ways do different perspectives coalesce or clash, and why? Does it matter what we call ourselves? How are multi- and inter disciplinary approaches being incorporated, while maintaining communication with a ‘home’ discipline? Are there any anxieties over politics, disciplinary histories, identity, funding, career paths, acceptance, and recognition? What are perceived as typical and unconventional forms of practice?


Humanizing industrial archaeology
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/11/2021

As an archaeologist, I often enter factory spaces in Portugal that until recently were fully operational. When these places cease to produce and are closed, they are also cleaned of most of the traces and testimonies of the presence of people on the site, retaining only what is believed to be of interest concerning heritage studies. Sometimes, it is the archaeologist who forgets that these sites were used by people, and relegates human traces to the background, inadvertently highlighting operating chains, processes, structures, architecture, machines, and tools. However, rather than having workers, a factory space has, first of all, people and having people means traces of feelings: tiredness, happiness, sadness, hope, anxieties, fear, joy and humour, feelings that are difficult to find in an archaeological context. This absence is even worse if the site was previously “prepared” for an investigator to enter the scene. However fortunately, there are places where key areas remain untouched, such as changing rooms, lockers inside the changing rooms, the concierge, the guard's house or the canteen. These sites are fundamental for studying the human presence within the factory. This paper aims to explore the potential of a multidisciplinary approach to these parts of the factory and what can they tell us about people. The intersection of areas as distinct as archaeology, architecture, social anthropology, ethnography and civil engineering, combined with the oral testimonies of the people who worked in those factories will work in highlighting the human part of industrial archaeology. JOÃO LUÍS SEQUEIRA, UNIVERSIDADE DO MINHO, PORTUGAL


“Garbology” and the archaeology of industry: Field walking in the hinterlands of Royal Worcester
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/11/2021

Worcester is known for a number of iconic industrial-age products, including Worcestershire Sauce and the Royal Worcester Porcelain. Archaeologically, these industries are represented by both domestic and industrial discard. The city of Worcester had no central rubbish collection before the 20th century. The industrial waste from the porcelain factories was a problem throughout the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. According to the Worcester Royal Archives waste from the kiln firings was bought by farmers to use as hardcore and was spread on fields. By systematic fieldwalking in the fields around Worcester we have been able to recover material which dates from all stages of the operations of the porcelain factories. The manufacturing process, the chaîne opératoire, of the Royal Worcester Porcelain is well documented, as are elements of the social organization of the workshop employees. We have also been able to infer cohorts of factory workers that are represented by the waste, people otherwise invisible in the art historical record. Products recovered range from all aspects of the firing and decorative stages, for both high end and industrial porcelain uses. By combining historical and art historical records with the archaeological analysis of finds we will discuss the importance of field survey data to the reconstruction of elements of the Industrial past, including factory development and organization. HELEN L LONEY, UNIVERSITY OF WORCESTER; ANDREW W HOAEN, UNIVERSITY OF WORCESTER License


Gideon Mendel in Calais: what are the ethical implications?
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/10/2021

I will reflect on the work we’ve been doing at MOLA with the things collected by Gideon Mendel in Calais could be seen as research on marginal people. What are the ethics of this work? What’s the line between participation and asking people to perform their refugee status for a western audience? In addition, a key aim of the project is to examine and question the methodologies that we use for our work on the deeper past, so I will discuss ways forward in terms of methodology, and what this work means for archaeology more generally. LOUISE FOWLER, MOLA


The Archaeology of Uncertainty
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/10/2021

My research is using archaeology to understand how the Palestinian refugee communities in the Lebanon perpetuate their culture and their heritage.These displaced people are marginalised, many of them in camps. They are not only stateless and denied citizenship in Lebanon but are also deprived of many basic rights. Palestinians have been living in uncertainty for the last 70 years. Their possessions, their land, their lives have disappeared; there is no material trace of their existence in Palestine. In the past they have featured in the archaeological record of Palestine in the work of people like Kenyon and Petrie but more recently evidence of their existence is being ignored, sold privately, destroyed or hijacked by the government of Israel. Palestinians communities in Lebanon are fighting this erasure by archiving objects and documents as proof of their existence, even using new technology to share these with others. However, it is not just the tangible that they are trying to preserve and pass on to future generations they are also sustaining the intangible. Palestinians want to publicise their plight, desperate to be seen and heard, fighting being erased from not only the past but also the present. HENRIETTA ALI AHMED, ROYAL HOLLOWAY


Erased from the Past: Bringing marginalised people into Archaeology  - Panel Discussion
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/09/2021

LOUISE FOWLER, MOLA; IIDA KÄYHKÖ, ROYAL HOLLOWAY, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON; HENRIETTA ALI AHMED, ROYAL HOLLOWAY


No Hetero!: Making way for alternative ways of knowing within archaeology
By: Recording Archaeology. Published: 03/09/2021

I can count on three fingers the number of doctorate holding Native Hawaiian Hawaiian archaeologists. While this might seem surprising to some, to me this reiterates a glaring issue within archaeology. We have a diversity problem and it impacts the way we think. When we do not expose ourselves to people whose norms are different from our own, our internal biases go unquestioned and we risk retelling the same old narratives. In order to recognize marginalized identities in the past, we must first start by questioning how the experiences of certain groups are delegitimized in modernity, especially by our institutions, and how this contributes to a lack of diversity within archaeological programs.Specifically, we must consider how our systemsdiscourage diversity by requiring certain coursework that is irrelevant, if not culturally insensitive, to certain students, andmust reexamine how ourclassroom environments contribute to the erasure of certain voices. This paper examines Hawaiian culture-based programs and wānanga in New Zealand to understand how integrating the ideologies of non-dominant cultures into education has been accomplished in modernity and to synthesize a list of ways our own universities can be modified to make it more friendly to diverse perspectives. Further, to expand on the promises integrating alternative ways of knowing holds for archaeology, I use a case study inspired by Native Feminist theories which reveals how acknowledging Hawaiian worldviews leads to the realization of non-binary, non-monogamous, and non-heterosexual identities in the Hawaiian past. D. KALANI HEINZ, UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES